Himachal Pradesh has twelve districts, each popular for its distinct life style and culture.

Chamba

The town of Chamba, is situated in the western Himalayas between north latitudes 32°10? and 33°13? and east longitudes 75°45? and 77°33?. The town stands on a plateau on the right bank of the Ravi river valley between Dhauladhar and Zanskar ranges south of the inner Himalayas. In the bansauli or genealogical rolls of the Chamba Rajas a reference occurs of place which was adorned with highly fragrant Champaka trees and guarded by Goddess Champavati or more popularly known as Chameshni. The temple was built by Sahil Varman in the honour of his daughter Champavati who is worshipped as a goddess in Chamba. Champavati temple became the family temple of the ruling family. More details.. 

 

Shimla

Shimla is the capital of the state of Himachal Pradesh in India. It is a very popular holiday-retreat during the summer months and is well-known for its Victorian architecture, which is reflected in certain areas of the Mall and The Ridge. It is also a famous holiday spot for honeymoon. Sitting majestically above the searing plains, the British designated the town as the summer capital of India. The higher levels of the town reflect this British connection, comprising mostly buildings in the Victorian style, while the lower slopes are occupied with Indian bazaars and restaurants. Traffic is banned from the historic central area, (known as the Mall) which means that the atmosphere is calm and the air pristine. More details..  

 

Kangra

The Kangra valley is one of the most picturesque valleys of lower Himalayas. The valley, sheltered by the sublime Dhauladhar range, is green and luxuriant. It provides a tremendous contrast in nature of places to be visited. Dharamshala is full of Buddhist air whereas ancient Hindu Temples like Bajreshwari Devi, Chamunda Devi, Baijnath Shiv temple and Jwala Devi ji dot the country side. The history of Kangra valley dates back to the Vedic times more than 3500 years ago. The area was exposed to successive invasions, the last being the British domination of the princes of many small the hill states. Despite the onslaughts and political upheavals, the arts and crafts of the region continued to develop and found lyrical expressions. Crafts like the exquisitely designed shawls and miniature paintings of this region are internationally appreciated. More details.. 

 

Kullu

The most charming and beautiful Kullu valley spreads out its charm on either side of river Beas. The valley runs north to south of this river and is 80km long and about 2km at its broadest. Yet with awe inspiring glens and mossy meadows encircled by the rushing streams and meandering brooks, flung east & west, a fairly wide area is open to the tourists, the trekkers, the mountaineers, the artists and to anyone who wishes to escape the heat & dust of the plains to breathe the exhilarating air of the Himalaya and enjoy the spectacle of the variegated mountain scenery. The valley is also famous for its exquisitely woven colourful hand made shawls and kullu caps. More details..

 

Mandi

The historic town of Mandi (800 m) is built along the banks of the river Beas. It has long been an important commercial centre and the sage Mandva is said to have meditated here. This one time capital of the princely state of Mandi is a fast developing town that still retains much of its original charm and character. Today, it is a district headquarters. Mandi is renowned for its 81 old stone temples and their enormous range of fine carving, it is often called the ‘Varanasi of the Hills’. The town has remains of old palaces and notable examples of ‘colonial’ architecture. The temples of Bhutnath, Trilokinath, Panchvaktra and Shyamakali are among the more famous ones. The week long international Shivratri fair in Mandi is the major attraction of the area every year. More details..

 

Solan

Blessed with a pleasant climate all the year round. Solan is a district headquarter and has the famous temple of Shoolini Devi and from Solan the Jatoli village (15 km) and the temple of Lord Shiva and on Rajgarh road the Buddhist Monastery (18 km) may be visited. Known as the “Mushroom city of India” Solan has an old brewery (11 km) and a sprawling horticulture and forestry university at Nauni (16 km). HPTDC hotel at Barog and other pvt hotels & restaurant are available at Solan. More details.. 

 

Hamirpur

This is another area situated at lower elevation and  comparatively warmer but has some hilly ranges covered with Pine forests. These hills can be developed for trekking and camping during winter months. This district was made in 1972 by carving it out from the Kangra district. It is well connected by roads from all sides and thus can be promoted as a tourist destination by developing some historical and religious places. At present the known attractions are Deot-SidhTemple of Sujanpur Tihra and Nadaun. Hamirpur town is the Headquarter of this District, which lies on Shimla-Dharamshala road. More details.. 

 

Bilaspur

Formerly the seat of the ruler of the State is  now submerged in the Gobind Sagar,it was situated on the south east side of the Satluj. Bilaspur Township is situated just above the old town of Bilaspur at an height of 670 m. above sea level. The new Bilaspur Township can be truely described as the first planned hill town of the country. The pleasure of a visit will be enhanced manifold when a motor launch is preferred as the means of travel, gliding through cool and enchanting waters of the lake.The Nalwari or annual cattle fair is held at Bilaspur for four or five days in March / April, the occasion is marked by wrestling and other amusements. More details.. 

 

Lahaul and Spiti

Lahaul and Spiti are two remote Himalayan Valleys of H.P. lying on the Indo-Tibet border. Strange, exciting, primitive, these valleys are unsurpassed in mountain scape, in the rugged beauty of their rocky escapements and the splendor of their snow covered peaks.Lahaul is marked by a central mass of uniformly high mountains and massive glaciers. The two rivers, Chandra and Bhaga which rise on either side of the Baralacha La, flow through the narrow Chandra and Bhaga valleys. Lahaul is a land of fascinating Buddhist art and culture. The monasteries of Lahaul-Spiti are rich repositories of ancient murals, thankas, wood carving and golden images of Padmasambhava. Spiti is the sub division of Lahaul & Spiti district with its hqrs. at Kaza. It is called “Little Tibet” because it has almost the same terrain, vegetation & climate . Spiti also means “Middle Country”. It lies between Tibet, Ladakh, Kinnaur, Lahaul & Kulu. From Shimla via Kinnaur there is a motorable road which remains open upto Kaza for 8 to 9 months. About 10kms. ahead of Pooh, satluj enters India near Shipki la & Spiti river joins it at Khab. The road then goes to Sumdo via Hangrang valley. From Sumdo Spiti valley starts. The Spiti river flows fast through deep gorges at some places. More details.. 

  

Kinnaur

Located in the dizzying heights of the Himalayas, with passes that remain closed for six months linking them with the rest of the world, Kinnaur, Spiti & Lahaul were till now a forbidden land. Only a chosen few were granted permission to visit this secret world, officials, Moravian missionaries who settled here in 1853 and a few mountaineers. Now this area has been opened for the daring and adventurous to discover what had been hidden from the world for centuries. From the riotous green of the Sangla Valley filled with orchards of apricots, peaches, chilgozas and apples to the magnificent desolation of the Hangrang Valley. More details.. 

 

Una

Una has been carved out of Hoshiarpur district of Punjab in 1966 where the hilly areas of Punjab were transferred to Himachal Pradesh and the whole area is warm. It has borders with Kangra Hamirpur and Bilaspur and then acts as a gateway to these regions. Efforts are being made to develop same places in Nangal and Bhakra areas. More details.. 

 

Sirmaur

Nahan, capital of Sirmaur, is situated on an isolated ridge in the Shiwalik hills, overlooking greenfields. Nahan is a well laid-out picturesque town, known for its cleanliness and dust free streets. Saint and princes are linked with the origin of Nahan. The city was founded as a capital by Raja Karan Prakash in 1621. Another version recalls a saint who lived with a companionable Nahar on the site where the Nahan palace now stands “Nahar” means a Lion and probably the town takes its name from this saint. More details..